Starting from Scratch Concept Helps Business, Credit Departments Reinvent Themselves in Better Imag



Normal
0




false
false
false

EN-US
X-NONE
X-NONE








































































































































































/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:"Table Normal";
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-priority:99;
mso-style-qformat:yes;
mso-style-parent:"";
mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin:0in;
mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;
line-height:115%;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:11.0pt;
font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";
mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;
mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman";
mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast;
mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;
mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;
mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman";
mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}






Tuesday’s NACM Credit Congress Super Session, largely to discuss business of the organization, doubled as a call to arms for business and credit departments to act, instead of talk about acting, more and strive to re-invest in making their organizations run as they imagine.

Super Session Speaker Joe Calloway, author of best-seller “Becoming a Category of One,” used Nashville’s own Grand Ole Orpy as an example of a business reinventing itself somewhat. While that was by necessity, as an aftermath of massive flooding, Calloway said more businesses and professionals should take an opportunity to really look at things from their most basic levels and try to rebuild. 

“If you were starting from scratch, what your business look like,” said Calloway, building off a point made earlier in the day by NACM Chairman Kathy Tomlin. “We need to recreate ourselves…we need to start from scratch. To me it’s a great idea to sit back take a breath and think why would we not recreate ourselves?”

He mentioned companies including Google, which made a business plan out of nothing that existed before;  Apple, which watches lines of customer’s waiting for the first day of sales of products they don’t even yet know what they do (See: iPad); and Jim Beam, a company that prides itself on trying out new ideas quickly rather than waiting through weeks and months of tweaking and meetings all while not launching the product or service discussed. What those companies have in common, said Calloway, is a “culture of constant improvement”…it’s a tenant that should be a given.

(Editor’s Note: Check back for continuing coverage here at our blog. Extended coverage will be available in future editions of eNews and Business Credit Magazine).

Brian Shappell, NACM staff writer

No comments:

Post a Comment